ALASKA CONSTITUTIONAL CONVENTION

November 15, 1955

EIGHTH DAY

PRESIDENT EGAN: The Convention will come to order. Now Reverend Armstrong will come forward and we will have our daily invocation. (Delegates standing as Armstrong comes forward)

ARMSTRONG: Our Heavenly Father, we are mindful of the blessings that we have, of the freedom of our country, for the building of our communities, for the raising of our families. Thou hast made us protectors of the faith of democracy. Lord, give us wisdom in the development of this constitution for the State of Alaska to proceed with Thy wisdom, Thy power and charity. In Christ's name, amen.

PRESIDENT EGAN: The Chief Clerk will please call the roll.

CHIEF CLERK: I would like to be clear on the point. Does the change in the rule apply to attendance roll call also?

PRESIDENT EGAN: No, I would say it that rule does not apply to attendance roll call.

(The Chief Clerk called the roll.)

CHIEF CLERK: Two absent.

PRESIDENT EGAN: We will proceed with the reading of yesterday's journal. Mr. Sundborg?

SUNDBORG:. Mr. President, I move and ask unanimous consent that the reading of yesterday's journal be dispensed with at this time and that the journal be approved as written.

LONDBORG: Objection.

PRESIDENT EGAN: Mr. Sundborg asks unanimous consent. Mr. Londborg objects.

SUNDBORG: I so move.

PRESIDENT EGAN: Mr. Sundborg moves.

JOHNSON: I second it.

PRESIDENT EGAN: Mr. Johnson seconds the motion that we dispense with the reading of yesterday's journal and that the journal be approved. Mr. Londborg?

LONDBORG: I would like to just find out how many days we go on this way. We should at least have some assurance that the

business yesterday. It would be nice to know just exactly what the business was.

PRESIDENT EGAN: Mr. Sundborg.

SUNDBORG: Mr. President, I am sure we are going to have a journal shortly. We are still in the early stages of organizing the secretariat, and it has just been physically impossible as I understand it for a completed journal to be on our desks each morning while the staff is so limited. It has not been filled out yet with all the employees that we are going to have here a bit later, and during this time I would like to ask that the delegates show a little consideration for the secretarial staff by not requiring it to produce a daily journal by the early hour in the morning.

PRESIDENT EGAN: Mrs. Hermann.

HERMANN: Mr. President, I am not opposed to dispensing with the reading of it, but I think we should reserve the privilege of approving it when it is on our desk.

PRESIDENT EGAN: If there is no objection, the Chair will hold that when the journals do appear that any delegates will have the right to bring to the attention any possible errors in the journal of any date prior to the time that it finally shows. Mr. Kilcher?

KILCHER: Before I know how to vote on this motion, I would like to know if the Secretary can give us an estimated time when we will have yesterday's journal available.

PRESIDENT EGAN: Could the Secretary answer this question?

CHIEF CLERK: It's ready. It just has to be reproduced. We have to get some typists. All the journals are all written. I have one copy of it but last night's was not completed, but as soon as we get some typists all that has to be done is the stencils cut and run off. If anyone wants to look at the journal, they are available.

SECRETARY: Mr. President, a typist is now available, it can be reproduced this morning, I am sure.

PRESIDENT EGAN: Do you mean today sometime we will have a copy of yesterday's journal?

CHIEF CLERK: If we adjourn and I can get out of this seat.

NOLAN: It takes quite a few hours on a day like yesterday with the amount of business that went through, it takes quite a few hours afterward so the help would have had to work up to

morning, so you would have to actually wait until later in the day.

PRESIDENT EGAN: Thank you, Mr. Nolan. Is there any other discussion on this motion before us of Mr. Sundborg's? The motion was that the reading of yesterday's journal be dispensed with at this time. Is that your intention, Mr. Sundborg?

UNIDENTIFIED DELEGATE: Did he also ask that it be approved?

SUNDBORG: I will drop that from the unanimous consent request.

LONDBORG: I will withdraw my objection in realizing the impossibility of reading it now considering he drops that part of his motion.

PRESIDENT EGAN: We will consider that part of any motion previously adopted on any other day was also dropped as far as the Chair was concerned. If there is no objection the reading of yesterday's journal is ordered dispensed with at this time. Mr. Secretary, here is a communication.

SECRETARY: Operation Statehood, Anchorage Chapter, Anchorage. Alaska.

"Honorable William Egan, President

Alaska Constitutional Convention

College, Alaska

Dear Mr. President:

"Operation Statehood presents to the Alaska Constitutional Convention, this, the Alaska Flag.

"To members of Operation Statehood, the Constitutional Convention is an historic and solemn occasion, and it is our objective to, through this presentation, take a small and humble part in your deliberations.

"We rest in the knowledge that yours will be a job well done, and we have abiding faith that your labor will assist measureably in bringing to a happy conclusion our long struggle for full citizenship as the 49th State of the United States of America.

Respectfully,

/s/Ancil H. Payne

Ancil H. Payne

President

Operation Statehood"

Operation Statehood, I believe you have the flag. If the Sergeant at Arms could come forward and attach the flag to the standard it would be appreciated at this time.

WHITE: On behalf of Operation Statehood it gives me great pleasure to present this Alaska flag to the Alaska Constitutional Convention.

(The Sergeant at Arms came forward.)

PRESIDENT EGAN: The Convention may stand at ease. The Convention will come to order. Mr. Sundborg.

SUNDBORG: Mr. President, I move and ask unanimous consent that the Secretary be instructed to write a letter of appreciation of the Convention to Operation Statehood for the gift of the Alaska flag.

PRESIDENT EGAN: Mr. Sundborg asks unanimous consent. You have heard his request. Is there objection? Mr. Johnson?

JOHNSON: No objection. I would like to add to that motion that if Mr. Sundborg has no objection, the communication which we received be spread upon the journal of today's proceedings in its entirety.

SUNDBORG: I accept that amendment.

PRESIDENT EGAN: The request of Mr. Johnson has been added to Mr. Sundborg's unanimous consent request. If there is no objection it is so ordered. Are there reports of standing committees? Mr. Secretary, you may read the communications.

(The Secretary read communications from the President of the University of Alaska calling attention to the fact that the facilities of the infirmary were available to delegates and to the American Association of University Women meeting to be held November 21 at which the women delegates and wives of delegates are to be honored guests, were read. Reminder of the Home Economics Department open house, Thursday, was read.)

PRESIDENT EGAN: The Chair would like to at this time bring to the attention of all delegates that the Fairbanks Chamber of Commerce is having its no-host dinner tomorrow evening at 7:30 at the Rendezvous. In as much as the Fairbanks Chamber of Commerce has put so much effort in attempting to make the hospitality part of our stay here very pleasant, the Chair hopes that every delegate can be there. Mr. Secretary, you might read the communication that was interrupted yesterday.

644 12th & D

Juneau, Alaska

November 3, 1955

The Constitutional Convention

Territory of Alaska

P. 0. Box 4003

College, Alaska

Gentlemen:

Some years ago the Indians throughout the United States found it necessary to organize in an effort to protect their rights as established by law and treaty. They realized that freedom, even in these United States had to be protected, nurtured and defended against the common enemy of human selfishness.

Thus the National Congress of American Indians came into being and a proclamation was issued by the organization to the People of the United States to further establish a common bond of understanding.

It seems appropriate at this time, on the eve of Alaska's historical moment, to present the same message to the Constitutional Convention assembled at College, Alaska with the thought that it may influence the members of the convention to a greater responsibility in protecting the lives and liberties of all the citizens of the new state of Alaska and any rights that have been established from time immemorial in the relationship between the people who have settled here in Alaska and the aborigines.

We offer you our unconditional friendship and faith in accomplishment to establish justice, insure domestic tranquility, provide for the common defense, promote the general welfare and secure the blessings of liberty for all.

Sincerely yours,

/s/ Elizabeth Peratrovich

ELIZABETH PERATROVICH

Alaska Representative

and Member of Executive

Council

National Congress of Am-

erican Indians

SECRETARY: The letter includes a copy of the original proclamation.

PRESIDENT EGAN: Is it the wish of the Convention that it will

MARSTON: Mr. President, I move that this communication be made a part of the record.

PRESIDENT EGAN: Mr. Marston asks unanimous consent that this communication be made a part of the record. Hearing no objection it is so ordered. Are there reports of standing or select committees? Mr. Barr?

BARR: Mr. President, before we make reports I would like to make the motion that the Secretary be instructed to provide a small bulletin board on which we can post these communications on meetings. We have no way of remembering that phone number for instance or any other information that might be desirable. This is not a part of that motion but as a suggestion, it is kind of hard to put anything on these concrete walls, but I notice there is a wooden frame around that switchboard over there (pointing to fuse box) and if it were hung on that it serves a double purpose and save the delegates from electrocution before this Convention is over. I ask unanimous consent that the Secretary provide a bulletin board.

PRESIDENT EGAN: Mr. Barr asks unanimous consent that the Secretary be instructed to provide some sort of bulletin board. Mr. Secretary, had you already made arrangements?

SECRETARY: There is one, placed by the mailbox in the Convention information headquarters. It could easily be arranged to have one here if that is the desire of the Convention.

PRESIDENT EGAN: The desire evidently of the Convention is to have one also established here in Convention Hall. We are down to introduction and first reading of proposals. Are there any proposals to be introduced for first reading at this time? Mr. McLaughlin?

MCLAUGHLIN: Mr. President, I request a three-minute recess.

PRESIDENT EGAN: If there is no objection the Convention will stand at recess for three minutes. Hearing no objection the Convention is at recess.

AFTER RECESS

PRESIDENT EGAN: The Convention will come to order. The Convention will revert to the introduction of committee reports. Mr. Johnson?

JOHNSON: Mr. President, in the absence of the chairman of the committee on gavels, I should like to report that we have acquired a gavel which I believe is symbolic of Alaska and certainly as fine a piece of ivory carving that I have ever

old, maybe a little more than that and it was carved about five years ago and is absolutely without flaw. It is an unusual thing in the ordinary mammoth ivory that's found around Alaska so outside of the fact that we have to get a plate and put it on here, I do believe your committee has performed its function and I will now turn over the gavel to you. These were thrown in by the man from whom I obtained it. I bought the gavel however, but he put in these two letter openers which the President may use as he sees fit.

PRESIDENT EGAN: We certainly appreciate your efforts Mr. Johnson.

JOHNSON: Incidentally, it was Mr. Al Retzlaf of U. S. Smelting Refining and Mining Company who carved the gavel. That is a hobby with him. He does not do it as a commercial proposition at all. This particular gavel had been his own and rather a prized possession, and he did finally agree to sell it to the Convention.

PRESIDENT EGAN: If there is no objection the Chair will instruct the Secretary to write a letter to Mr. Retzlaf expressing the appreciation to Mr. Retzlaf for being able to obtain a gavel of this nature.

JOHNSON: Incidentally, we also will, as quickly as possible, procure a working gavel which will probably be a wooden mallet.

PRESIDENT EGAN: Thank you, Mr. Johnson, and the Chair would like to inform Mrs. Hermann it will possibly be two or three days before we can release her gavel but it will be held under lock and key until that time.

HERMANN: Thank you, Mr. President.

PRESIDENT EGAN: Now we have before us the introduction and first reading of proposals. Mr. Robertson?

ROBERTSON: I would like to introduce a proposal entitled, "Courts, Judicial, Tenure, and Juries."

PRESIDENT EGAN: Mr. Robertson desires to introduce a proposal entitled, "Courts, Judicial, Tenure, and Juries." The proposal will be referred to the Committee on Judiciary. The Secretary may read the proposal for the first time.

SECRETARY: "Constitutional Convention of Alaska. Delegate Proposal No. 1. Introduced by R. E. Robertson. COURTS, JUDICIAL, TENURE, AND JURIES."

PRESIDENT EGAN: The proposal is referred to the Committee on Judiciary. Are there other proposals to be submitted at this

or resolutions to be presented? Mr. Sundborg.

SUNDBORG: I would like to move and ask unanimous consent that we amend our rules, Page 13, Rule 35, the second line, strike the words "main question be now put and substitute in lieu thereof the words "previous question be ordered" so that the whole sentence will read "The previous question shall be put by the President in this form, shall the previous question be ordered?"

PRESIDENT EGAN: Mr. Sundborg"asks unanimous consent that the amendment changing the words Shall the main question be now put?" to read "Shall the previous question be ordered?"

MCLAUGHLIN: Objection.

PRESIDENT EGAN: Objection is heard.

JOHNSON: I second the motion.

PRESIDENT EGAN: A second to Mr. Sundborg's motion is heard and the question is before us for discussion. Mrs. Sweeney.

SWEENEY: Mr. President, I was wondering if the first motion would not be to rescind our action on this taken yesterday. We have adopted the rules as a whole and then section by section.

PRESIDENT EGAN: Mrs. Sweeney, a proposed amendment to the standing rules takes a two-thirds vote of the assembly. It would not necessarily come that we would have to rescind the action but would take a two-thirds vote to amend any of the rules. The matter is before us for discussion. Is there further discussion? Mr. McLaughlin?

MCLAUGHLIN: Mr. President, my only concern on the matter now is, it appears to be good English, and I am sure the Rules Committee would not confess the whole thing was unnecessary in the first place. If I may inquire -- does the President find it awkward?

PRESIDENT EGAN: The President will have to take that question under advisement.

MCLAUGHLIN: Mr. President, I withdraw my objection under the circumstances.

PRESIDENT EGAN: Mr. McLaughlin withdraws his objection.

V. RIVERS: I object.

PRESIDENT EGAN: The question is, "Shall Mr. Sundborg's

adoption of the amendment signify by saying "aye", all opposed by saying "no". The "ayes" have it and the proposed amendment is ordered adopted. Are there any motions or resolutions to come before the body at this time? Is there any unfinished business? If there is no objection, the Chair at this time would like to ask Mr. Emil Sady to come forward to give a brief explanation as briefly as possible on this proposed chart relative to committee meetings and on various other matters that might aid t!,e delegates in their functions at committee meetings, and to give any other pertinent information that Mr. Sady might think helpful and necessary before the committees start to function. If there is no objection the Chair would ask Mr. Sady

V. FISCHER: Mr. President,

PRESIDENT EGAN: Mr. Victor Fischer.

V. FISCHER: Do we not go into the Committee of the Whole?

PRESIDENT EGAN: That would be the proper procedure, Mr. Fischer.

V. FISCHER: I so move and ask unanimous consent.

PRESIDENT EGAN: Mr. Fischer asks unanimous consent that the Convention resolve itself into a Committee of the Whole for the purpose of hearing Mr. Emil Sady. Is there objection? Mr. Barr, would you come forward and take the Chair please? (Mr. Barr came forward and took the Chair.)

COMMITTEE OF THE WHOLE

(At this time the Committee of the Whole met . The President appointed Mr. Barr to preside. )

PRESIDENT EGAN: The Convention will come to order.

JOHNSON: Mr. President, I ask for a ten-minute recess.

PRESIDENT EGAN: If there is no objection, Mr. Johnson asks unanimous consent that the Convention stand at recess for ten minutes. If there is no objection the Convention is at recess.

RECESS

PRESIDENT EGAN: The Convention will come to order. The Chair would like to announce the telephone number upstairs in the information center at which you might have messages left is 5830, and the Chief Clerk has just informed the Chair that she spoke to the person in charge of the cafeteria upstairs and that about 12:30 would be the best time for the Convention

there is no objection the Chair would like to request that the records show that Mr. Buckalew was present this morning. And on that, Mr. Buckalew, we had a report of one-half of the select committee to purchase a gavel and wonder if you had the other half of the report. The Convention will come to order. Is there any other unfinished business to come before the Convention now? Mr. Johnson?

JOHNSON: Mr. President, regarding the last half of that report, if we may refer back to the committee reports, I have just learned that the working gavel should be here tomorrow and will be furnished by the Fairbanks School District. It will be ready tomorrow.

PRESIDENT EGAN: Thank you for that information. Mr. White?

WHITE: Mr. President, yesterday I gave notice of intention to reconsider a motion but got tied up in intricacies of parliamentary procedure. I object to the back row being roped off. I wonder if it is the intention of that committee to go ahead and rope us off. If so, I would like to move that they cease and desist.

PRESIDENT EGAN: Mr. White has raised the question as to the propriety of roping off the delegates to the Convention. Is there any other discussion? The Chair will open the discussion. Mr. Victor Rivers?

V. RIVERS: I would just like for the record to show at this time to avoid further controversy, that the price of the gavel was satisfactory to the minority half of the committee, Mr. Buckalew.

PRESIDENT EGAN: Thank you for that information. If there is no objection, Mr. White, you might confer with the Chairman of the Committee on Administration as to the roping procedure. Is there any other unfinished business?

COOPER: Mr. President, I would like to inquire -- just immediately after recess I asked the engineer on the recording system if any duplicate tapes had been made yet. He advised me that they had not been. They were awaiting the arrival of equipment coming from the States in which to accomplish the duplication. Now as I recall, the motion was made that the duplicate tapes would be edited. Now am I correct in that?

PRESIDENT EGAN: No.

COOPER: All right then, the duplicates are merely going to be a duplicate of the entire proceedings of the plenary session, is that right?

PRESIDENT EGAN: That is the way in which the motion was adopted.

V. RIVERS: Mr. Chairman, may I say a word on that?

PRESIDENT EGAN: Mr. Victor Rivers.

V. RIVERS: It is going to be my recommendation to the Statehood Committee that from those duplicate tapes we tape certain parts in to certain length programs which will then be furnished to the various radio stations, the parts which may prove interesting to the electorate. So the duplicate tapes, I anticipate will later be used for that purpose so that any of the proceedings that will be of an informative nature and will be adaptable to use on the radio stations and television, may be made available that way. I don't say the Statehood Committee is going to do that but I'm going to recommend and see if we can't do that in our program for advertising and publicizing the Convention and the Constitution.

PRESIDENT EGAN: Mr. Collins.

COLLINS: Mr. President, it is a matter of small importance but it seems that each night our different chairs have been scrambled and it is a hard matter in the morning to find your location. I hesitate to take my jackknife and cut my initials on these chairs. I think something might be done to prohibit changing of the seats.

PRESIDENT EGAN: Is it the desire of the delegates that they maintain as their desks the particular desks they are sitting at at the present moment? Then, if there is no objection, the Chair would like to request the Secretary at this time to have the Sergeant at Arms and the messenger working together, identify in some manner, each chair so the seats will be identified in the regular meeting of the Convention. Mr. Coghill?

COGHILL: Mr. President, it was felt it was the intention of the Convention that the Committee on Administration acquire tables and chairs. We have some but we do not have all the tables yet so we felt that we would have to leave the armchair type desk until we acquired the full amount of tables necessary, and then at that time a procedure of assignment would be made.

PRESIDENT EGAN: Then is it your observation, Mr. Coghill, that it might be, so long as you intend to change the seating here, it might not be necessary to go to the trouble of identifying these desks at this time?

COGHILL: Yes.

JOHNSON: I shall object to any change in the seating so far as I am concerned. I like it where I am.

PRESIDENT EGAN: Perhaps anyone with objection could arrange to meet with the Committee on Administration and talk the matter over with that Committee at some time. Mr. Nolan?

NOLAN: Mr. President, all it would take would be a typewritten slip and some Scotch tape to the desk right now.

PRESIDENT EGAN: If there is no serious objection, the seats will be identified until such time as the Convention insists there will be a change made. At this time under unfinished business the Chair would like to state that at this dinner that is to be a no-host dinner to be held under the auspices of the Chamber of Commerce tomorrow night, it is necessary that reservations be made. The Chair would like to request that before leaving here today, immediately after a recess, that each delegate who plans to be present tomorrow night at the dinner, leave his or her name with the Chief Clerk so that she might make the proper reservations as quickly as possible. Is there any other unfinished business? Special orders of the day? Any general order of the day? Mr. Victor Fischer?

V. FISCHER: Mr. President, I have a question. What is a special order of the day?

PRESIDENT EGAN: Well, something that may have been held over as a special order of the day by request or if you have something real special that you thought might not be in the category of unfinished business it would be considered as a special order of the day. If there is nothing else to come before the Convention at this time the Chair would entertain a motion for a recess, but the Chair would like to announce that immediately following the next recess we would like to have a meeting of the chairmen of all of the committees of the Convention. Mr. King?

KING: Mr. President, last Saturday we had a paper left here, a newspaper on our desk. That of course was the Colonel Eielsen Memorial edition of the Eielsen Friendly News. It was timely and very well put together, and I am sure a great number of us here appreciated it very much, and I think it would be a nice gesture of the Convention to write a letter to the Commander of the Eielsen Air Force Base in appreciation, and 1 so move.

PRESIDENT EGAN: Mr. King moves and asks unanimous consent that a letter of appreciation be written to the Commander of the Eielsen Air Force Base commending him on the particular edition of the Eielsen Friendly Times of November 11, 1955. Mr. Barr?

BARR: Mr. President, might I amend that so that a copy of the letter also will be addressed to the editor of the paper?

PRESIDENT EGAN: Mr. Barr asks unanimous consent that the particular motion be amended to have a copy of that letter sent to the editor of the paper at Eielsen Air Force Base. Is there objection? Hearing no objection it is so ordered. Do we have anything else to present to the Convention at this time? Mr. Robertson?

ROBERTSON: Mr. President, may I ask if the wives of delegates are invited to attend the dinner at the Chamber of Commerce?

PRESlDENT EGAN: The wives are invited. If there is nothing else to come before the Convention the Chair will accept a motion for a recess.

V. RIVERS: Mr. President, I move and ask unanimous consent for a recess until 4 o'clock this afternoon.

PRESlDENT EGAN: Mr. Victor Rivers asks unanimous consent that the Convention stand at recess until 4 o'clock this afternoon. Is there objection? Mr. Hellenthal?

HELLENTHAL: I had hoped that following the meeting of the committee heads that some schedule of committee meetings could be arranged, and I can't see any reason for the lateness. Is there maybe a good reason I am not aware of?

V. RlVERS: I will amend that time to any time the body sees fit but I thought it might be a very good time for us previous to recess, to announce committee meetings at this time. I can visualize the first committee meeting of all committees will take about approximately one hour in getting their organization set up. I thought that would allow them enough time to start off.

PRESIDENT EGAN: If we are going to have a general discussion, will someone second Mr. Rivers's motion.

GRAY: I second the motion.

PRESIDENT EGAN: It has been seconded by Mr. Gray, that the Convention stand at recess at 4 o'clock this afternoon and while ordinarily such a motion is not debatable, for a point of information, the Chair will allow it in this case.

HELLENTHAL: We may be putting the cart before the horse, because following this committee meeting I think we will be able to call meetings without conflict and in an organized manner rather than in uncoordinated manner. I would suggest that we meet here again at 1:30 and then make the announcements.

V.RIVERS: I will accept that amendment.

PRESIDENT EGAN: Mr. Rivers asks unanimous consent that his

until 1:30 p.m. Is there objection? Mr. Barr?

BARR: I have no objection. I wonder if it has been announced that the best time for going to lunch is 12:30. Is everybody aware of that?

PRESIDENT EGAN: That was announced from the Chair, Mr. Barr, that 12:30 would generally be the best time for the Convention delegates to eat lunch. If there is no objection then, the Convention is at recess until 1:30 p.m.

RECESS

PRESIDENT EGAN: The Convention will come to order. Mr. Johnson?

JOHNSON: Mr. President, may I refer to the order of business of introduction of proposals?

PRESIDENT EGAN: If there is no objection, Mr. Johnson will refer to introduction of proposals at this time. The Secretary will read the proposal in its first reading.

SECRETARY: "Constitutional Convention of Alaska. Delegate Proposal No. 2, introduced by Maurice T. Johnson, TO BE INTRODUCED IN BILL OF RIGHTS".

PRESIDENT EGAN: The proposal will be referred to the Committee on Preamble and Bill of Rights.

JOHNSON: Mr. President, I have a resolution which I would like to offer and ask the Clerk to read.

PRESIDENT EGAN: The Secretary will proceed with the first reading of the resolution.

SECRETARY: Constitutional Convention of Alaska, November 15,

1955. Resolution: "RESOLVED, that the Alaska Constitutional Convention formally invite the Honorable William Knowland, U. S. Senator from California, to address the Convention sometime during his stay at the University of Alaska.

RESOLVED further, that the invitation of the Convention be issued to Senator Knowland through the President of the Convention."

JOHNSON: Mr. President, I move and ask unanimous consent that the rules be suspended, and that this motion be acted upon immediately without committee reference.

PRESIDENT EGAN: Mr. Johnson moves and asks unanimous consent that this motion be acted upon immediately without committee

R. RIVERS: I will object just for a point of information. What is it going to cost the Convention?

JOHNSON: I would not think it would cost anything since Senator Knowland is to appear at the University on November 29 at the convocation at which he is to receive an honorary degree, and it just occurred to me, since he is a national figure, that it would be fine for this Convention to have him appear briefly.

R. RIVERS: He is coming anyway? We are just inviting him to address the Convention? I withdraw my objection.

PRESIDENT EGAN: Mr. Rivers withdraws his objection. If there is no further objection it is so ordered and the Convention will extend an invitation to Senator William Knowland to address the Convention at some appropriate time during his stay here in Fairbanks.

JOHNSON: Under the suspension of the rules I was simply asking that the matter be acted upon immediately. If that motion was carried then, I now move that the resolution be adopted in order that the record might complete.

PRESIDENT EGAN: The Chair misunderstood your request, Mr. Johnson. The Chair understood that you meant that in your original request. The Chair has ruled that your original request has been adopted and that an invitation will be extended to Senator William Knowland to address this Convention at some appropriate time during his stay. Mr. Robertson?

ROBERTSON: Mr. President, I want to refer back to introduction of proposals again. I would like to introduce a proposal if I may.

PRESIDENT EGAN: If there is no objection. Hearing no objection, Mr. Robertson, you may present your proposal. The Secretary may read the proposal.

SECRETARY: "Constitutional Convention of Alaska. Proposal No. 3, introduced by R. E. Robertson, TAXATION.

PRESIDENT EGAN: The proposal is ordered referred to the Committee on Finance. Mr. Sundborg.

SUNDBORG: I would just like to make an inquiry here whether these proposals that have come in have been in conformity with our rules as to the matter of brief title. I don't know who can answer that question. Our rules say that each proposal shall carry a brief title. I would assume that as in the case of a bill before the legislature that the title would

be a word like taxation. It should say something about what treatment it would give to the subject of taxation.

PRESIDENT EGAN: The Chair would hold your point is well taken, Mr. Sundborg and all proposals should have some sort of brief title in order that in its first reading some idea can be obtained to the nature of the proposal. Mr. McCutcheon?

MCCUTCHEON: It would appear to me that the title, "TAXATION" . is a relatively short instrument, the title of "TAXATION" is sufficient. If you were to go into the title, why you would give the whole body of the text or material. I would be inclined to agree with Mr. Robertson's proposal in this particular instance.

PRESIDENT EGAN: In this particular instance, Mr. McCutcheon, but you go along on the premise that each proposal should have something that would adequately describe briefly, the body of the text? The Chair didn't realize that that was such a brief title. Are there other proposals to be introduced at this time? If not, the Convention will proceed with its business. At this time again, the Chairman would like to remind all delegates that in order to attend t[[paragraph]],e dinner to be given by the Fairbanks Chamber of Commerce at the Rendezvous tomorrow night it will be necessary that you secure reservations, and it will be necessary that you secure reservations, and that you notify the Chief Clerk as quickly as possible as to your intentions of attending that dinner so she can make the proper reservations in time. At this time the Chair would like to announce that a committee of committee chairmen during the noon hour have arranged a tentative Convention schedule during the sessions of Monday through Saturday. This is the tentative schedule they have set up for presentation to you:

9:00 a.m. to 9:20 a.m. Plenary Session

9:30 a.m. to 10:50 a.m.

I Rules

II Administration

V Rights

VIII Executive Branch

XIV Resolutions

Now, those five committees are set up to meet on Monday through Saturday, 9:30 - 10:50 a.m. You will note that included in those five committees are two or three committees that at this time won't have too much to do, so your committee of chairmen felt there would be ample time, at least for the time being, to set them up from 9:30 - 10:50. The second group of committee meetings are set up from

III Style

Vl Elections

X Resources

and the next group of committees are set up tentatively to meet from

2:00 p.m. to 3:20 p.m.

VII Legislative Branch

IX Judiciary

XI Finance

and the fourth group of committees are set up to meet from

3:30 p.m. to 4:50 p.m.

IV Ordinance

XII Local Government

XIII Amendment

Now all these committees are set up in such a manner, these groups, that the attendance of any member of those committees at a committee meeting during those times will not interfere with his membership on any other committee that might be meeting, and so while this is a tentative suggestion and possibly won't hold through the entire Convention, the Chair feels that it is so important to get the committee meetings under way that if there is no objection the Chair for the time being, at least, will declare that these will be the official times for those particular committees to meet until further notice. Mr. Victor Rivers.

V. RIVERS: Mr. President, I have no objection except I want to discuss it briefly and to say if we are going to start meeting in plenary session at 9:00 o'clock, and have Committee meetings through the day that that will then foreclose any evening committee meetings because if you are going to work from 9 in the day until 5:00 or 5:30 I don't believe there will be many of us fresh enough to do much after dinner. I thought that one of the work sessions should possibly fall in the evening for some of the committees that will be at certain periods, heavily burdened.

PRESIDENT EGAN: Mr. McLaughlin.

MCLAUGHLIN: Mr. President, first of all, on the explanation, this runs Monday through Saturday, it is tentative. There is nothing in here that is a mandate to Mr. Rivers if he is a chairman, to prohibit Mr. Rivers. from having a meeting either at any time after 4:50 on any week day or having one all day Sunday. These rules were essential to prevent the conflict which was inevitable. It is almost as Dr. Sady said, a mathematical miracle that we can provide that every day of the

say, "We will have a meeting at such and such a time." This is not compelling, it is understandable, upon the Convention but it is compelling upon all other committee chairmen, in a sense that if the chairman of any committee desires, or exercises his right to use the specific hour for the meeting of his committee, it will not be interfered in by any other committee. To me it is obvious, it is not intended to be prohibitive, it is merely prohibitive if Mr. Rivers shall be prevented in the future.

V. RIVERS: Point of order. I object to having my name used and put it in the record. I made a point of discussion only, and I want to say this does not preclude us from meeting at 9 a.m. That was the point I made. After meeting at 9:00 a.m. you might not want an evening meeting.

MCLAUGHLIN: Forgive me.It is merely explanatory, sir. That is not compelling upon the committees, but that is reserved time for each committee.

PRESIDENT EGAN: Mr. Victor Fischer.

V. FISCHER: Mr. President, I have an inquiry as to how rigid this schedule is, would it be possible for instance for a committee to meet at a time other than that which is assigned to the committee, even if all members may not be present at that time if the committee chairman feels that otherwise insufficient time is available? For instance, the committee in Group IV might possibly want to meet in the morning, and at that time say they meet during the time assigned to Group II.

PRESIDENT EGAN: Mr. Fischer, it would be the Chair's opinion that in a case of that nature, it would then become the committee chairman's duty to attempt to arrange such a thing by finding out just what other committees were meeting at that time and whether there would be a conflict. The Chair can see no reason why as Mr. McLaughlin stated, there is no compelling reason, even then, if there is no conflict, against having a meeting at a different time if necessary so long as it does not conflict with any of the memberships on other committees.

V. FISCHER: Mr. President, my point was that in some cases a committee might possibly want to meet even if there is a conflict, with one or two members maybe absent. Would there be any basic objection to that?

PRESIDENT EGAN: The Chair does not feel if the majority of the committee members want to meet that there could be any objection to it if they decided that. Mrs. Hermann?

HERMANN: Mr. Chairman, I would like to ask the Secretary for a point of information in connection with the bus schedule.

free to bring delegates out at 8:30 since it conflicted with the school bus schedule, and I think we ought to take that into consideration before deciding on that 9 o'clock hour.

PRESlDENT EGAN: Mrs. Hermann, that is what the Chairman pointed out to the members of this committee, and then on the other hand the Chairman remembered that he has been coming out on that 8:30 bus every morning and there are usually only three or four people on the entire bus the bus that leaves for the University at 8:30 in the morning is practically empty every morning.

HERMANN: It is a small bus, however, Mr. President. Does it come all the way to this building or stop further down?

PRESIDENT EGAN: It stops in front of the old cafeteria. It probably would not take too much effort to get them to come over here, but that is a point on which we will have to be clear. The Chief Clerk has suggested that perhaps we have overlooked one thing here on the Convention schedule -- that is that between 1:30 and 2 o'clock it might be wise to call an afternoon session in the event there might be resolutions to present or proposals to present or other business to come before the Convention. If there is no objection, then in between the second and third schedules on your sheet we will assume there will be a brief plenary session to begin at 1:30 p.m. each day. Hearing no objection it is so ordered. Is there further business to come before the Convention at this time? Mrs. Sweeney?

SWEENEY: Mr. Chairman, I would like to ask one point. These proposals that have been introduced now and assigned to committee -- as I understand it, copies will be distributed among the delegates -- is that right?

PRESIDENT EGAN: The Chair does not recall what the rule says but copies of all proposals it would be assumed, would be available to all the delegates of the Convention.

SWEENEY: Will they be mimeographed so we w111 have copies?

PRESIDENT EGAN: That is the Chair's understanding. Is that correct, Mr. Secretary? Is there any other business.

GRAY: What is the effective time of this schedule as of now or as of tomorrow?

PRESIDENT EGAN: As of now.

GRAY: I think arrangements should be made, if they run a small bus out at 8:30, make arrangements to use the largest bus.

PRESIDENT EGAN: The Committee on Administration would do so immediately upon recess, if possible, if they could find out the answer to that question.

COGHILL: Mr. President, could we have a two-minute recess and I ask unanimous consent, to confer with the Secretary on assignment of committee rooms?

PRESIDENT EGAN: Mr. Hellenthal?

HELLENTHAL: A point of information. Mr. Stewart informed me a few minutes ago that there are six rooms upstairs available for the six committees that will meet this afternoon, and when the committees get up there he will show them their rooms.

PRESIDENT EGAN: It will also be possible that every committee can have its committee room in this building if some of those rooms are used by two different committees at different times. In that way the membership of the committees will not have to

run around to some other building. That is a matter that will

have to be resolved between the committee chairmen as to what committees will use a particular room. Mr. Coghill, you asked unanimous consent that the Convention stand at recess for two minutes so you consult about this bus schedule. If there is no objection the Convention will be at recess for two minutes. The Convention is at recess.

RECESS

PRESIDENT EGAN: The Convention will come to order. Is there any other business to come before the Convention at this time? Mr. McNealy?

MCNEALY: I find that committee meetings scheduled here for 2 o'clock there is no conflict; there is no member of the Ordinances Committee on either the Legislative, Judiciary or Finance, at least for this day I would like to announce a meeting of the Ordinances and Transitional Measures after any recess.

PRESIDENT EGAN: Mr. McCutcheon.

MCCUTCHEON: Pursuant to the established periods, the Legislative Committee will meet immediately upon adjournment or recess as the case may be.

PRESIDENT EGAN: Mr. McNealy and Mr. McCutcheon announce meetings of the Committee on Ordinances and Transitional Measures and the Legislative Committee immediately upon recess. Mr. McLaughlin?

MCLAUGHLIN: The Judiciary Committee will meet upstairs in the

PRESIDENT EGAN: Mr. McLaughlin announces a meeting of his Judiciary Committee upstairs immediately after recess or adjournment. Mr. Nerland?

NERLAND: Mr. President, the Finance Committee will also meet immediately after adjournment upstairs.

PRESIDENT EGAN: Mr. Nerland announces a meeting of the Finance Committee immediately upon adjournment. Mr. Coghill.

COGHILL: Mr. President, in accordance with the Convention schedule there will be arrangements for a large bus to leave the Nordale at 8:30 in the morning and to come to the front of the Convention Hall.

PRESIDENT EGAN: You have heard the announcement by Mr. Coghill. Are there any other committee announcements at this time? Mr. Rosswog?

ROSSWOG: A meeting of Local Government Committee at 3:30.

PRESIDENT EGAN: Mr. Rosswog announces a meeting of the Local Government Committee at 3:30. Mr. Collins?

COLLINS: The Committee on Amendment will not meet this afternoon. One of our members is absent and we will try to find time sometime tomorrow for organization. If that is agreeable with the majority of.the members here we will postpone until tomorrow.

PRESIDENT EGAN: Mr. Collins announces there will be no meeting of the Committee on Amendment this afternoon. Is there any other business to come before the Convention? If not, the Chair will entertain a motion. Mr. Johnson.

JOHNSON: Mr. President, I move that the Convention stand adjourned until tomorrow morning at 9:00 o'clock and ask unanimous consent.

PRESIDENT EGAN: Mr. Johnson moves and asks unanimous consent that the Convention stand adjourned until tomorrow at 9 a.m. Is there objection? Hearing no objection the Convention is adjourned until tomorrow at 9 a.m.